Conference Program

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You can view the daily program by clicking on any of the above session types or click on "Search Presentations" to see a list of all conference presentations. You can also search the entire program by author, paper id, or keywords using the search box above. If you have any concerns about the program please contact 11ncee@eeri.org.

Tuesday 26-Jun-18: 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

SS001.S - New Technologies for Bridge ColumnsS - New technologies for bridge columns

DATE/TIME: Tuesday 26-Jun-18 10:30 am - 12:00 pm ROOM: Beaudry B

MODERATOR: Mohamed ElGawady, Missouri S&T;

DESCRIPTION: This session will provide a forum for students, researchers, and practitioners to discuss new technologies for bridge columns. Seismic behavior of bridge columns constructed using high performance material and innovative structural systems will be presented. High performance materials such as ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC), and shape memory alloys (SMA) are of interest for this session. Research on structural systems such as hollow core, segmental, concrete filled tubes columns will be presented during this session as well.

Parametric Study of an Innovative Bridge Column Concept with ECC and Cu-Al-Mn SEA Bars (ID 70)
Bora Gencturk, University of Southern California; Seyyed Farshid Hosseini Khasheh Heiran, University of Southern California;

Seismic Performance of Bridge Slab-Column Joints with Headed Reinforcement (ID 427)
Juan Murcia-Delso, University of Texas at Austin; P. Benson Shing, University of California: San Diego; Vasileios Papadopoulos, University of California: San Diego;

Experimental and Numerical Studies on Precast Bridge Columns with Shifted Plastic Hinging (ID 779)
Kevin Mackie, University of Central Florida; Haider Al-Jelawy, University of Central Florida; Zachary Haber, Genex Systems LLC at the Federal Highway Administration Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center;

Seismic Performance of One-Piece Pipe Pins and Precast Rebar Hinges in Bridge Piers (ID 916)
Keri Ryan, University of Nevada, Reno; Ali Mehrsoroush, Nevada Dept. of Transportation; M. Saiid Saiidi, University of Nevada, Reno;

Shape Memory Alloy for Bridge Columns (ID 1434)
Mostafa Tazarv, South Dakota State University; Shahria Alam, University of British Columbia;

SS002.S - Application And Calibratuion of ASCE 41 GuidelinesS - Application and Calibration of Asce 41 Guidelines

DATE/TIME: Tuesday 26-Jun-18 10:30 am - 12:00 pm ROOM: Hollywood

MODERATOR: Ayse Hortacsu, Applied Technology Council;

DESCRIPTION: Over the last 5 years, Applied Technology Council (ATC) has been conducting projects clarifying the use, as well as evaluating the accuracy, of guidance provided in ASCE 41, Standard for Seismic Evaluation and Rehabilitation of Buildings. This session will have specific focus on ASCE 41’s current (and impending 2017) version and provide helpful guidance to attendees. The FEMA-funded ATC-124 project is developing an Example Application Guide that provides step-by-step illustrated examples for procedures outlined in ASCE 41-13 for common aspects of structural engineering projects, including selection of analysis procedures and acceptance criteria, overturning, and evaluation of real buildings of different structure types. ATC also nearing completion of the ATC-114 Phase 2 and 3 projects, funded by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), that are developing guidance for use of nonlinear structural analysis for design of buildings, specifically reinforced concrete moment frame and steel moment frame structures. Most recently, ATC initiated a new NIST-funded project that is calibrating the nonlinear analysis guidance provided in ASCE 41 by comparing the results to damage documented in buildings due to earthquake or laboratory test shaking. It is expected that the findings of this calibration study will inform the guidance provided in future versions of ASCE 41.

Guidelines on Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis for Seismic Design of Steel Moment Frames (ID 1074)
Gregory Deierlein, Stanford University; Amit Kanvinde, University of California, Davis; Dimitrios Lignos, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology; Stephen Bono, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger;

Development of an Example Application Guide for ASCE/SEI 41-13 (ID 1102)
Bret Lizundia, Rutherford + Chekene; Andrew Herseth, Federal Emergency Management Agency; Ayse Hortacsu, Applied Technology Council; Brian McDonald, Exponent, Inc.; Jim Collins, PCS Structural Solutions; Mark Moore, ZFA Structural Engineers; Michael Braund, Degenkolb Engineers; Mike Mahoney, Federal Emergency Management Agency; Ronald LaPlante, Division of State Architect; William Holmes, Rutherford + Chekene;

ATC 134 - Benchmarking ASCE 41 Predicted Performance to Observed Performance (ID 1692)
Russell Berkowitz, Forell / Elsesser Engineers;

Guidelines on Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis for Performance-Based Seismic Design of Steel and Concrete Moment Frames (ID 1808)
Curt Haselton, Califronia State University Chico and HB-Risk; Veronica Cedillos, Applied Technology Council; Additional Authors to Be Added, Haselton Baker Risk Group, LLC; Alyse Hortascu, Applied Technology Council; Chia-Ming Uang, University of California; Dimitrios Lignos, EPFL; Gregory Deierlein, Stanford University; Jim Malley, Degenkolb Engineers; John Hooper, , Magnusson Klemencic Associates; Mahmoud Hachen, Degenkolb Engineers ; Santiago Pujol, Purdue University; Silvia Mazzoni, University of California; Stephen Bono, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger, Inc.; Wassim Ghannoum, University of Texas;

SS003.S - Earthquake Resilience Modeling With NIST's Community Resilience Planning GuideS - Earthquake Resilience Modeling With NIST’s Community Resilience Planning Guide

DATE/TIME: Tuesday 26-Jun-18 10:30 am - 12:00 pm ROOM: San Fernando

MODERATOR: David Bonowitz, DBSE;

DESCRIPTION: Earthquake resilience continues to grow as an area of research, practice, and public policy. Progress is slowed, however, by inconsistent terminology, metrics, and criteria. A 2016 NIST Special Publication, Community Resilience Planning Guide for Buildings and Infrastructure, can help. The CRPG provides a pragmatic, jargon-free framework for describing and measuring community resilience. In brief, community resilience is measured by the post-event recovery time of key city-wide services or functions – housing, schools, jobs, commerce, government services, etc. The CRPG recognizes resilience as an attribute of human organizations, like whole communities, not as an attribute of tangible buildings and infrastructure. To the degree that a community’s resilience is related to the performance of its physical parts, it is related more to post-earthquake reoccupancy and recovery than to immediate safety. With this understanding, a community’s current resilience can be charted as expected recovery times. Goals can be shown on the same timelines, and the gaps can drive research and policy. Most important, the CRPG presents resilience with clarity even as it adapts to communities that vary in size, age, and vulnerability. The result is a clearer, more effective link between research, practice, and community-specific policy. This session will include presentations of recent research and applications tied together by their use of CRPG principles and definitions. The presented work need not have been sponsored by NIST or motivated by the CRPG. On the contrary, the session invites abstracts on diverse topics; the CRPG will merely be used as a common set of terms for presentation and communication. With this common basis, the session will allow participants from different fields to offer insights, compare notes, and take lessons without getting lost in terminology. Presenters and attendees will build on the common CRPG foundation and on each other’s work.

Recovery Model for Commercial Buildings Considering Earthquake Hazard (ID 1660)
Vesna Terzic, California State University Long Beach; Daniel Saldana, California State University Long Beach; Peny Villanueva, California State University Long Beach;

Resilient Schools for Community Recovery: Oregon Experience (ID 384)
Kent Yu, Seft consulting group; James Newell, Seft consulting group; Jeffery Soulages, Intel Corporation;

Estimation of Post-Earthquake Recovery on a University Campus Using REDi Methodology (ID 970)
Nicole Paul, Arup; Ibrahim Almufti, Arup; Ji Su Lee, Arup; Michael Mieler, Arup;

Will the LA Ordinance Enhance the Seismic Resilience of the City's Residential Communities? (ID 1370)
Henry Burton, University of California, Los Angeles;

SS004.S - Puebla, Mexico EarthquakeS - Puebla, Mexico Earthquake

DATE/TIME: Tuesday 26-Jun-18 10:30 am - 12:00 pm ROOM: San Gabriel

MODERATOR: Lucy Arendt, St. Norbert College;

CO-MODERATOR: Gilberto Mosqueda, UC San Diego;

DESCRIPTION: SPONSORED BY: WSP. Members of reconnaissance teams that studied the impacts of the September 19, 2017 earthquake will present their observations.

Earthquake Overview and Response (ID SS088A)
Sergio Alcocer, UNAM;

Geotechnical Impacts (ID SS088B)
Tara Hutchinson, UC San Diego;

Earthquake Early Warning (ID SS088C)
Richard Allen, UC Berkeley;

Structural Impacts (ID SS088D)
Luciano Fernandez, UAM;

Integration of geotechnical and structural performance based design for tall buildings in Mexico City (ID SS088E)
Rodolfo Valles, WSP; Sissy Nikolaou, WSP;

Lifelines Impacts (ID SS088F)
Craig Davis, LADWP;

SS005.S - Developments in Earthquake Engineering History as Documented by Oral HistoriesS - Developments in Earthquake Engineering History as Documented by Oral HIstories

DATE/TIME: Tuesday 26-Jun-18 10:30 am - 12:00 pm ROOM: Santa Monica B

MODERATOR: Robert Reitherman, consultant;

DESCRIPTION: The EERI oral history program, begun in 1984, has published biographical histories on twentynine individuals as of the fall of 2017. The books are based on interviews conducted with the subjects, supplemented by additional content based on background research. The criteria for inclusion in the series are that the subjects (1) have made an outstanding career-long contribution to earthquake engineering, (2) have valuable first-person accounts to offer concerning the history of earthquake engineering, and (3) have backgrounds, considering the series as a whole, that appropriately span the various disciplines that contribute to the field of earthquake engineering The field via vignettes of the subjects in the series. The disciplines are broadly grouped into three categories: structural engineering, geosciences and geotechnical engineering, and planning

Developments in Earthquake Engineering History as Documented by Oral Histories (ID 1902)
John Anderson, University of Nevada Reno; Laurie Johnson, Laurie Johnson Consulting; Loring Wyllie, Jr., Degenkolb Engineers; Robert Reitherman, consultant; Thalia Anagnos, San Jose State University;

Discussion Panel (ID SS075A)
John Anderson, University of Nevada, Reno; Laurie Johnson, Laurie Johnson Consulting and Research; Loring Wyllie, Degenkolb Engineers; Robert Reitherman, Consultant; Thalia Anagnos, San Jose State University;

Tuesday 26-Jun-18: 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm

SS006.S - Recent Advancements In ASCE-41 Nonlinear Component Models For Performance-Based Earthquake EngineeringS - Recent Advancements in Asce-41 Nonlinear Component Models for Performance-based Earthquake Engineering

DATE/TIME: Tuesday 26-Jun-18 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm ROOM: Hollywood

MODERATOR: Ayse Hortacsu, Applied Technology Council;

DESCRIPTION: The Applied Technology Council (ATC) is nearing completion of a project funded by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) that is developing recommended hysteretic relationships for use in nonlinear seismic analysis in support of performance-based seismic design and evaluation projects. Nonlinear static and dynamic analysis are commonly used by engineers to assess the probable performance of existing buildings and to design major new buildings. The currently available guidance documented in ASCE 41, Standard for Seismic Evaluation and Rehabilitation of Buildings, includes recommended backbone shapes and control points that describe the envelope of hysteretic response of various structural elements when subjected to ramped, fully-reversed, cyclic loading protocols. However, substantial additional research has been conducted since the development of the information presented in ASCE 41, enabling the development of updated backbones and control points for steel braced frame and moment frame, reinforced concrete shear wall and moment frame, and masonry and wood shear wall structures. The ATC-114 project conducted a study of available laboratory data and analytical studies benchmarked on these data to develop a recommended general protocol that includes global acceptance criteria and element action-level acceptance criteria, that are used with the data compiled to develop element-specific acceptance values. This session will start with an overview and introduction of the project and then delve into details about the individual structural systems studied.

Nonlinear Modeling of Wood Frame Shear Walls for Performance Based Earthquake Engineering (ID 116)
Maria Koliou, Texas A&M University; John van De Lindt, Colorado State University;

Revised ASCE-41 Modeling Recommendations for Steel Moment-Resisting Frame Systems (ID 727)
Dimitrios Lignos, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne (EPFL); Ahmed Elkady, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne (EPFL); Alexander Hartloper, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne (EPFL); Gregory Deierlein, Stanford University; Ron Hamburger, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger;

Proposed Update of Nonlinear Models for Reinforced Masonry Shear Walls in ASCE 41 (ID 893)
Jianyu Cheng, University of California: San Diego; Pui-Shum Shing, University of California, San DIego;

Revised ASCE-41 Modeling Recommendations for Concentrically Braced Frames (ID 972)
Dawn Lehman, University of Washington; Andrew Sen, University of Washington; Charles Roeder, University of Washington; Daniel Sloat, Degenkolb Engineers; Jeffrey Berman, University of Washington;

Modeling Squat Reinforced Concrete Shear Walls for Seismic Analysis (ID 1178)
Siamak Epackachi, Amirkabir University of Technology; Andrew Whittaker, University at Buffalo; Ayse Hortacsu, ; Nikhil Sharma, Indian Institute of Technology Gandhinagar; Ronald Hamburger, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger;

Proposed Updates to ASCE 41 for Modeling of Flexure-Controlled Reinforced Concrete Walls (ID 1639)
Laura Lowes, University of Washington; Dawn Lehman, University of Washington;

Tuesday 26-Jun-18: 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

SS007.S - Seismic Risk Assessment of Real Estate PortfoliosS - Seismic Risk Assessment of Real Estate Portfolios

DATE/TIME: Tuesday 26-Jun-18 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm ROOM: San Fernando

MODERATOR: William Graf, ImageCat Inc.;

DESCRIPTION: SPONSORED BY IMAGECAT. Geographically distributed groups of buildings (portfolios) present special challenges for seismic risk assessment -- for engineers, for owners and lenders, for insurers and for public agencies. Current catastrophe software is oriented toward earthquake insurance (RMS, CoreLogic, AIR Worldwide) or toward public agencies (HAZUS) for individual scenarios (e.g., ShakeOut). This session will examine portfolios seismic risk issues from a wide range of perspectives, with invited papers and a panel at the end to engage with the audience. Current work by ASTM subcommittee WK55885 on Seismic Risk Assessment of Real Estate Portfolios will be summarized, and input from the broader community sought.

A New ASTM Standard for Seismic Risk Assessment of Real Estate Portfolios (ID 624)
William Graf, ImageCat, Inc.;

Catastrophe Loss Modeling Through Robust Simulation (ID 717)
Yajie Lee, ImageCat, Inc.;

Quantifying the Social and Economic Value of Citywide Seismic Retrofit Ordinances (ID 957)
William Graf, ImageCat, Inc.; Evan Reis, US Resiliency Council;

Impacts of Geographic Distribution and Secondary Building Characteristics on Seismic Risk (ID 1742)
Tao Lai, AIR Worldwide; Andrew O'Donnell, AIR Worldwide; Peter Civitenga, AIR Worldwide; Sizheng Li, AIR Worldwide;

The Role of the Engineer in Portfolio Seismic Risk Assessment (ID 1767)
Mark Ellis, AIG;

Tuesday 26-Jun-18: 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

SS008.S-New Seismic Resilience Activities for Ports & HarborsS - New Seismic Resilience Activities for Ports & Harbors

DATE/TIME: Tuesday 26-Jun-18 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm ROOM: Beaudry A

MODERATOR: Omar Jaradat, Moffat & Nichol;

CO-MODERATOR: Kandiah Arulmoli, Earth Mechanics Inc.;

DESCRIPTION: Sponsored by: Moffatt & Nichol, Earth Mechanics, Inc. ASCE, BergerABAM, Port of Los Angeles, Port of Long Beach, Sage Engineers. The Port Special Session provides perspectives from port authorities, consultants, and a researcher on seismic analysis and design topics that impact the planning, protection, design, and retrofits of development and redevelopment projects of piers and wharves at west coast ports. The session provides an overview of: ASCE/COPRI piers and wharves design standard; ASCE/COPRI guidelines for seismic design of bulkheads; wharf upgrades projects at the Port of Los Angeles and Port of Long Beach; a seismic retrofit of Pier 6 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard; and vulnerability and damage analysis maps that can be used by decision makers to assess and potentially mitigate impacts of hazards at ports and harbors.

Port Special Session (ID 1908)
Kandiah Arulmoli, Earth Mechanics, Inc.; Omar Jaradat, Moffat & Nichol;

Update on ASCE/COPRI Piers and Wharves Design Code Standard (ID 1909)
Omar Jaradat, Moffatt & Nichol;

ASCE 61 Updates and New ASCE Guidelines for Seismic Design of Bulkheads (ID 1930)
Gayle Johnson, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger; Pooja Jain, Moffatt & Nichol;

Wharf Structure Design Consideration of Pier E Re-development Project at the Port of Long Beach (ID 1931)
Cheng Lai, Port of Long Beach;

Upgrade of Berths 226-236 Everport Container Wharf Terminal at the Port of Los Angeles (ID 1932)
Angel Lim, Port of Los Angeles;

Harbor Vulnerability to Extreme Natural Hazards (ID 1933)
Patrick Lynett, University of Southern California; Adam Keen, University of Southern California (USC); Akut Ayca, University of Southern California (USC); Kevin Miller, California Governor's Office of Emergency Services (CalOES); Rick Wilson, California Geological Survey (CGS);

Seismic Retrofit of Pier 6 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard Using Lead-Rubber Bearings (ID 1379)
Benjamin Pesicka, BergerABAM; Jacob Linke, BergerABAM; Jay Spady, Naval Facilities Engineering Command; Robert Harn, BergerABAM;

SS009.S - A Preview of the Proposed Changes related to Seismic Design Requirements and Seismic Hazard Maps in the 2020 NEHRP Recommended Seismic ProvisionsS - A Preview of the Proposed Changes related to Seismic Design Requirements and Seismic Hazard Maps in the 2020 NEHRP Recommended Seismic Provisions

DATE/TIME: Tuesday 26-Jun-18 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm ROOM: Hollywood

MODERATOR: David Bonneville, Degenkolb Engineers;

CO-MODERATOR: Jiqiu Yuan, NIBS/Building Seismic Safety Council;

DESCRIPTION: Established as a Council of the National Institute of Building Sciences in 1979, the Building Seismic Safety Council (BSSC) deals with the complex technical, regulatory, social and economic issues involved in developing and promulgating building earthquake risk mitigation provisions that are national in scope. The NEHRP Recommended Seismic Provisions for New Buildings and Other Structures is a consensus-approved document that involves numerous efforts from experts in earthquake research, seismic hazard mapping, seismic engineering design, and construction materials. The NEHRP Provisions is the resource document that scrutinizes the broadest extent of the seismic design process and provides state-of-knowledge information to improve the current seismic design procedures in the national seismic design standards and model building codes. BSSC developed and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) published the first NEHRP Provisions in 1985, and released later editions in 1988, 1991, 1994, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2009, and, 2015. The work for 2020 NEHRP Provisions, under the sponsorship of FEMA, started in 2015. Through its Project 17 Committee (P17C), the 2020 cycle includes a joint effort of FEMA/BSSC and USGS to update the basis for development of next-generation seismic design value maps, looking at many fundamental issues such as acceptable risk, stabilizing map values, and redefining seismic design category, which in turn will greatly affect the associated seismic design requirements. Through its Provision Update Committee (PUC), the 2020 Provisions investigate a breath of topics related to seismic performance objectives, seismic force resisting systems, modal response spectrum, shear wall design, nonstructural components, nonbuilding structures, soil-structure interaction, and rigid-wall flexible diaphragms. This special session will present the latest update on developing national seismic design value maps and present a preview on important code change proposals that may have wide ranging implications regarding future seismic design requirements for buildings.

Progress on the 2020 NEHRP Recommended Seismic Provisions (ID 326)
David Bonneville, Degenkolb Engineers;

Pending Updates to USGS National Seismic Hazard Model: For Earthquake Engineers (ID 389)
Nicolas Luco, U.S. Geological Survey; Mark Petersen, U.S. Geological Survey; Sanaz Rezaeian, U.S. Geological Survey;

2020 NEHRP Provisions Seismic Performance Objectives (ID 327)
Robert Pekelnicky, Degenkolb Engineers;

Updates on Modifications to Shear Wall Provisions (ID 333)
Satyendra Ghosh, S. K. Ghosh Associates Inc.;

Updates on Modifications to Diaphragm Seismic Design Provisions (ID 1891)
Kelly Cobeen, Wiss Janney Elstner Assoc.;

SS010.S - Theories of Owner Liability for Earthquake Losses: A debate by lawyers for non-lawyersS - Theories of Owner Liability for Earthquake Losses: A debate by lawyers for non-lawyers

DATE/TIME: Tuesday 26-Jun-18 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm ROOM: San Fernando

MODERATOR: David Bonowitz, DBSE;

DESCRIPTION: Myrick v. Mastagni established that the owner of a building can be liable for losses related to its earthquake performance. In particular, considering the full life of a building, the court held that an owner’s liability does not begin simply when the owner falls out of compliance with applicable codes and regulations. That was enough to resolve the Myrick case, but it left two crucial questions unanswered: 1. When does the owner’s liability begin? As soon as construction is done? When the design becomes obsolete as codes change? When buildings just like it perform poorly in earthquakes far away? When it’s put on a list as potentially hazardous? 2. When does the owner’s liability end? When it gets evaluated as “safe” by a standard lower than the code for new construction? When it’s retrofitted to comply with a program with limited goals? This session will invite legal experts to answer these two questions in a debate-like format. The questions are especially important as seismic evaluation and retrofit programs proliferate around California. Los Angeles, for example, has mandated retrofit of about 13,000 “soft story” buildings but requires only minimal work that some engineers would even call inadequate to its purpose. Los Angeles has also mandated evaluation of about 1500 older concrete buildings, but retrofit is not required for another two decades. What is the owner’s liability in the mean time?

Theories of Owner Liability for Earthquake Losses: A Debate by Lawyers for Non-Lawyers (ID 1904)
David Bonowitz, DBSE;

SS011.S - Towards Improving the Seismic Evaluation and Performance of Nonstructural Components and SystemsS - Towards Improving the Seismic Evaluation and Performance of Nonstructural Components and Systems

DATE/TIME: Tuesday 26-Jun-18 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm ROOM: Santa Anita AB

MODERATOR: Eduardo Miranda, Stanford University;

CO-MODERATOR: Gilberto Mosqueda, UC San Diego;

DESCRIPTION: Nonstructural components typically represent 70 to 85% of the initial investment in buildings. Furthermore, their damage is typically triggered at levels of structural response much smaller than those required to initiate structural damage. Therefore, economic losses are typically dominated by losses associated with the damage to nonstructural components. Moreover, even in cases where there is minimal or no structural damage, the damage to nonstructural components often leads to the partial or total use of buildings. With the advent of Performance-Based Earthquake Engineering the importance of nonstructural elements is now not only widely recognized but the interest in the seismic performance is growing not only in the academic community but also in the design and manufacturer communities. This session is organized by the SPONSE Association which is an international, nonprofit, technical society of engineers, architects, manufacturers, insurers, builders, planners, public officials, and social scientists, interested in the Seismic Performance Of Non-Structural Elements.

Experiments on Seismic Compatibility of Low-Damage Drywall Partitions & Suspended Ceilings (ID 1731)
Rajesh Dhakal, University of Canterbury; Ali Tasligedik, Middle East Technical University-Northern Cyprus Campus; Atefeh Pourali, University of Canterbury; Gregory MacRae, University of Canterbury;

Towards a New Approach to Design Acceleration-Sensitive Nonstructural Components (ID 1009)
Eduardo Miranda, Stanford University;

Drift-Based Fragility Functions for In-Plane Loaded Masonry Infill Panels (ID 1027)
Andrea Chiozzi, University of Ferrara; Eduardo Miranda, Stanford University;

Simplified Seismic Evaluation Methods of Sprinkler-Piping Systems in Buildings (ID 1220)
Juin-Fu Chai, National Center for Research on Earthquake Engineering, Taiwan; Kuo-Chun Chang, National Taiwan University, Taiwan; Chang-Chen Yeh, National Taiwan University, Taiwan; Fan-Ru Lin, National Center for Research on Earthquake Engineering, Taiwan;

Evaluation of ASCE 7 Equations for Designing Acceleration-Sensitive Nonstructural Components (ID 570)
Hamidreza Anajafi, University of New Hampshire; Ricardo Medina, University of New Hampshire;

Finite Element Study on the Seismic Performance of Nonstructural Partition Walls (ID 1065)
Siavash Soroushian, K.N. Toosi University of Technology; Esmaeel Rahmanishamsi, ; Hamidreza Salmasi Javid, K.N. Toosi University of Technology;

Wednesday 27-Jun-18: 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

SS012.S - Seismic Resiliency Assessment of Urban Regions and Lifelines (Part 1)S - Seismic Resiliency Assessment of Urban Regions and Lifelines

DATE/TIME: Wednesday 27-Jun-18 10:30 am - 12:00 pm ROOM: Beaudry A

MODERATOR: Ertugrul Taciroglu, University of California Los Angeles;

CO-MODERATOR: Domniki Asimaki, California Institute of Technology;

DESCRIPTION: Recent advances taking place in the areas of performance-based assessment, ground motion prediction, and information technology—such as data harvesting and analytics, as well as cloud computing—are enabling seismic risk assessment of interconnected infrastructure components and facilities as a whole. The nexus of these advances brings new opportunities to quantify the seismic resiliency of coupled infrastructure systems and to devise policy and urban planning decisions at multiple spatial and temporal scales. In this 11NCEE Special Session, we aim to bring together academic researchers and industry practitioners with policy makers and planners to identify key research needs as well as critical pathways that will enable the implementation of research outcomes into real-life applications. Several invited talks will be followed by panel discussion and audience participation. The planned topics include:(1) Performance-based approaches to seismic assessment of various key structure types, facilities, and lifelines (from hazard characterization to response prediction);(2) Overview of computational tools and facilities presently available for undertaking regional assessment efforts, and a discussion of future needs;(3) Planning and resilient design of new/future infrastructure elements;(4) Current and planned efforts for assessment and improvement of seismic resilience of urban regions and lifelines.

Towards Scenario-Based Simulations of Coupled Distributed System Response on a City-Scale (ID 1829)
Domniki Asimaki, California Institute of Technology;

Methodology, Software and Policy for Optimum Seismic Resilience of Highway Networks (ID 1277)
Anastasios Sextos, University of Bristol; Ioannis Kilanitis, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki;

Regional Performance-Based Seismic Assessment of Transportation Networks (ID 420)
Barbaros Cetiner, University of California, Los Angeles; Ertugrul Taciroglu, University of California, Los Angeles;

Resiliency Enhancement of Communities Prone to Multi-Hazard Case of Tsunami and Earthquake (ID 443)
Navid Attary, Colorado State University; John van De Lindt, Colorado State University;

Assessing the Seismic Resilience of Interdependent Infrastructure Systems (ID 694)
Iris Tien, Georgia Institute of Technology;

Modeling the Effect of Utility Disruption in Post-Earthquake Housing Recovery Simulations (ID 804)
Agam Tomar, University of California Los Angeles; Henry Burton, University of California Los Angeles; Hua Kang, University of California Los Angeles;

Collecting Data for Exposure and Vulnerability Assessment: A Case Study in Guatemala City (ID 1568)
Dina D'Ayala, University College London; Harriette Stone, University College London; Omar Flores Beltetón, Universidad de San Carlos;

Modelling Interdependencies Among Critical Infrastructures at Urban Scale [Poster Location 136] (ID 1579)
Gian Paolo Cimellaro, Politecnico di Torino; Gianluca Scutiero, Politecnico di Torino; Marco Domaneschi, Politecnico di Torino; Stephen Mahin, University of California Berkeley;

SS013.S - Advances in Bridge Modeling and Non Linear Time History AnalysisS - Advances in Bridge Modeling and Nonlinear Time History Analysis

DATE/TIME: Wednesday 27-Jun-18 10:30 am - 12:00 pm ROOM: Beaudry B

MODERATOR: Mohamed Moustafa, University of Nevada Reno;

DESCRIPTION: There is a growing interest among the bridge community in adopting performance-based earthquake engineering (PBEE). Accurate modeling and rigorous nonlinear time history analysis (NLTHA) are central to fragility curves development, and in turn, indispensable for PBEE. Most of the current bridge codes such as AASHTO or Caltrans Seismic Design Criteria use classical force-based design or adopt displacement-based seismic design. NLTHA is usually limited to special cases for analysis of important bridges. However, with the recent advances in software and analysis methods, NLTHA is expected to extend to wider classes and more common bridge types to complement and/or replace current code methods, and ultimately contribute to a full PBEE framework. This is also reflected by the numerous recent or ongoing research studies that focus on providing robust modeling and analysis guidelines to capture nonlinear behavior of different bridge components and overall system behavior. This proposed session will have presentations of research focusing on advances in modeling and analysis towards performance-based design of bridges and bridge components. Some examples of the topics suitable for this session are: (1) modeling of damping and implications of damping assumptions including the damping model type (e.g. Rayleigh damping or modal damping), damping ratio, number of modes, and stiffness type; (2) soil-structure interaction at bridge abutments and pile foundations; (3) efficient computational methods (e.g. proper integration methods) for optimizing analysis time and achieving convergence for NLTHA; (4) ground motion selection and different methods for selecting or developing suite of earthquake records for NLTHA.

A Computational Framework for Systematic Bridge PBEE Applications (ID 797)
Abdulah Almutairi, University of California San Diego; Ahmed Elgamal, University of California San Diego; Jinchi Lu, University of California San Diego; Kevin Mackie, University of Central Florida;

Development of a Robust Nonlinear Solution Algorithm for Structural Analysis (ID 1252)
Xiao Liang, The State University of New York at Buffalo; Khalid Mosalam, University of California, Berkeley;

Software Calibration and Sensitivity Analysis of Ordinary Standard Bridge Seismic Response (ID 1276)
Michael Scott, Oregon State University; Kevin Mackie, University of Central Florida;

Time History Analysis of Different Bridge Configurations Using Rayleigh and Modal Damping (ID 120)
Mohamed Moustafa, University of Nevada, Reno; Mohammad Abbasi, University of Nevada, Reno;

A Frequency- And Intensity-Dependent, Lumped Parameter Model for Considering SSI Effects on Seismic Bridge Design and Assessment (ID 1789)
Anastasios Sextos, University of Bristol; Nikolaos Lesgidis, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki; Oh-Sung Kwon, University of Toronto;

SS014.S - LFE: Advances in earthquake reconnaissance technologies to measure resilienceS - LFE: Advances in earthquake reconnaissance technologies to measure resilience

DATE/TIME: Wednesday 27-Jun-18 10:30 am - 12:00 pm ROOM: San Gabriel

MODERATOR: Charles Huyck, ImageCat;

DESCRIPTION: SPONSORED BY IMAGECAT. Earthquake reconnaissance has evolved from collecting key observational data augmented with film photographs to a highly digital process. Mass data collection in-field not only provides an opportunity for subject-matter experts to make key observations on building and lifeline failures, but reconnaissance teams are recently discovering that it allows for detailed digital reconstruction of a wide variety of systems as well. Examples include ground-based lidar to capture landslides, UAV video providing 3D reconstruction of building damage, satellite imagery to track reconstruction and provide regional context, crowd-sourcing social and economic impacts before deployment, and hand-held devices allowing for the collection of field data on buildings, lifelines, and human subjects. These reconnaissance technologies are increasingly informing resilience modeling efforts beyond the structural environment- allowing researchers to understand why and how communities recover. This session will present several examples of new methods to monitor resilience.

Monitoring Business Resilience After Earthquakes: EERI Pilot Programs in CA and OK (ID 1906)
Yu Xiao, Portland State University;

Designing a Disaster Reconnaissance Field App with a User-Centered Approach (ID 499)
Scott Miles, University of Washington; Troy Tanner, University of Washington;

How Can New Technologies Help Us with Earthquake Reconnaissance (ID 1583)
Sean Wilkinson, Newcastle University; Claire Ellul, University College London; Dina D'Ayala, University College London; Emily So, University of Cambridge ; Enrica Verrucci, University College London; Harriette Stone, University College London; Phil James, Newcastle University; Tiziana Rossetto, University College London;

Development of a New Framework for Resilience Reconnaissance (ID 1536)
Michael Mieler, Arup;

3D Models of the Leader Valley Using Satellite & UAV Imagery Following the 2016 Kaikoura Earthquake (ID 1723)
Dimitrios Zekkos, University of Michigan; Adda Athanasopoulos-Zekkos, University of Michigan; John Manousakis, ; Marin Clark, University of Michigan;

SS015.S - Recent Research and Modeling Recommendations on Damping in BuildingsS - Recent Research and Modeling Recommendations on Damping in Buildings

DATE/TIME: Wednesday 27-Jun-18 10:30 am - 12:00 pm ROOM: Santa Anita AB

MODERATOR: Eduardo Miranda, Stanford University;

CO-MODERATOR: Farzad Naeim Farzin Zareian, University of California Irvine;

DESCRIPTION: The seismic response of buildings is sensitive to damping. The level of damping in the structure affects not only the peak amplitude but also the duration of response. As recommended in ASCE 7, a damping ratio of 5% is typically used for all buildings when doing seismic loading. When doing response history analyses, a Rayleigh damping is typically used. The best way to learn about the damping in buildings is by recording the response of buildings when they are subjected to dynamic loads and then inferring the damping by using the recorded response. While there has been a relatively large number of studies on damping in buildings subjected to wind loading, the number of studies on damping of buildings subjected to seismic loading is significantly smaller. Typically, only a reduced number of buildings has been studied and their results have been added to databases that mix results from different types of dynamic load, and results inferred using different techniques. The purpose of this special session is to present and discuss results from recent investigations on damping ratios inferred from instrumented buildings subjected to earthquake ground motions. Several recent studies have been conducted on system identification of damping on hundreds of buildings in California many of which have been subjected to various earthquakes offering a unique opportunity to study the variation of damping ratios with variables such as height, primary structural material, lateral resisting system, etc. Another important aspect is the level of damping associated with higher modes. Until recently there were very few studies on the damping ratios of higher modes which offer the opportunity to evaluate the validity of Rayleigh damping which is perhaps the most common method to model damping in structures. The session will also discuss the role of soil-structure interaction on the damping in buildings.

Preliminary Study of Correlation of Damping Percentages and Natural Periods of Tall Buildings in Multi-Countries (ID 1427)
Mehmet Celebi, USGS;

Characterization of the Variability in Estimation of Modal Damping of Building Structures (ID 1060)
Farzin Zareian, University of California, Irvine; Farzad Naeim, University of California, Irvine; Yijun Xiang, University of California, Irvine;

First Mode Damping Ratios Inferred from the Seismic Response of Buildings (ID 947)
Cristian Cruz, Nishkian Menninger; Eduardo Miranda, Stanford University;

Evaluation of the Role of Soil-Structure Interaction on Modal Damping Ratios in Buildings (ID 1006)
Eduardo Miranda, Stanford University; Cristian Cruz, Nishkian Menninger Structural Engineers;

Identification of Damping Ratios for Soil-Structure Systems from Seismic Response Signals (ID 1638)
Ertugrul Taciroglu, UCLA; Farid Ghahari, UCLA;

A Damping Element Model for Energy Dissipation Characterization in Building Structures (ID 995)
Farzin Zareian , University of California, Irvine; Yijun Xiang, University of California, Irvine;

SS019b.S - Recent Research on Column Base Connections and its implications on seismic designS - Recent Research on Column Base Connections and its implications on seismic design

DATE/TIME: Wednesday 27-Jun-18 10:30 am - 12:00 pm ROOM: Santa Barbara

MODERATOR: Amit Kanvinde, University of California Davis;

DESCRIPTION: Column base connections are arguably the most important connections transferring forces from the entire structure into the foundation. Since the publication of the American Institute of Steel Construction’s Steel Design Guide One on Base Plates (in 2006), significant research has accumulated on the topic of column base connections (especially in the context of their seismic response and design). This research, when integrated, has the potential to entirely transform the design and simulation practice for column base connections themselves, as well as the systems that they are a part of. However, the translation of this research into professional practice requires serious coordination on the part of researchers and industry leaders that are invested in these connections. The purpose of this special session is to generate this coordination, focused around the following themes: (1) reviewing recent findings on column bases – including bending and shear transfer mechanisms, strength and stiffness models, best-practices for simulation, and impact on building performance, (2) examining opportunities to transfer these research and technologies to practice, given the economic tradeoffs of structural performance, construction, design and manufacturing, and (3) strategies to facilitate these technology transfers, e.g., development of design documents, codes, or examples. The participants will include a mix of academics, structural designers, fabricators, and manufacturers representing the entire cross-section of stakeholders in the context of these connections. This will (possibly for the first time) provide a common venue for discussion dedicated solely to these important connections. It is expected that significant, actionable outcomes will arise from this session.

Laboratory and Field Study of Tack-Welded Anchorages Performance and Retrofitting Methods (ID 1439)
Erfan Alavi, Sazeh Consultants; Behnam Sohrabiani, Sazeh Consultants; Joobin Khanshaghaghi, Sazeh Consultants;

Anchor Rod Design for Nonbuilding Structures (ID 329)
Rick Drake, Fluor Enterprises, Inc.; Bob Bachman, Consultant;

AISC Seismic Design Manual 3rd Edition: Steel Moment Frame Column Base Connections (ID 1761)
Scott Adan, Ph.D., SE, SECB, Adan Engineering;

Recent Research on Exposed Base Plate Connections with Strategic Anchor Yielding (ID 1691)
Tara Hutchinson, University of California, San Diego; Christopher Trautner, SpaceX; John Silva, Hilti North America; Roberto Piccinin, Hilti Corporation;

Hysteretic Models for Column Base Connections (ID 1293)
Farzin Zareian, University of California, Irvine; Amit Kanvinde, University of California, Davis; Pablo Torres-Rodas, University of California, Irvine;

Recent Research on Column Base Connections and its implications on seismic design (ID 1390)
Amit Kanvinde, University of California Davis; Farzin Zareian, University of California, Irvine; Tara Hutchinson, University of California, San Diego;

Special Session (ID SS096)
Wednesday 12:00, Amit Kanvinde;

Wednesday 27-Jun-18: 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

SS018.S - Seismic Resiliency Assessment of Urban Regions and Lifelines (Part 2)S - Seismic Resiliency Assessment of Urban Regions and Lifelines

DATE/TIME: Wednesday 27-Jun-18 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm ROOM: Beaudry A

MODERATOR: Ertugrul Taciroglu, University of California Los Angeles;

CO-MODERATOR: Domniki Asimaki, California Institute of Technology;

DESCRIPTION: Recent advances taking place in the areas of performance-based assessment, ground motion prediction, and information technology such as data harvesting and analytics, as well as cloud computing are enabling seismic risk assessment of interconnected infrastructure components and facilities as a whole. The nexus of these advances brings new opportunities to quantify the seismic resiliency of coupled infrastructure systems and to devise policy and urban planning decisions at multiple spatial and temporal scales. In this 11NCEE Special Session, we aim to bring together academic researchers and industry practitioners with policy makers and planners to identify key research needs as well as critical pathways that will enable the implementation of research outcomes into real-life applications. Several invited talks will be followed by panel discussion and audience participation. The planned topics include:(1) Performance-based approaches to seismic assessment of various key structure types, facilities, and lifelines (from hazard characterization to response prediction);(2)Overview of computational tools and facilities presently available for undertaking regional assessment efforts, and a discussion of future needs;(3) Planning and resilient design of new/future infrastructure elements;(4) Current and planned efforts for assessment and improvement of seismic resilience of urban regions and lifelines

Community Resilience of Lifeline Systems: Societal Needs and Performance Assessment (ID 142)
Laurie Johnson, Laurie Johnson Consulting; Thomas O'Rourke, Cornell University; Veronica Cedillos, Applied Technology Council;

Developing a Performance Based Seismic Design Process for the Los Angeles Water System (ID 513)
Craig Davis, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power; Jianping Hu, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power;

Modeling Community Resilience to Earthquakes and Tsunamis: An Overview of the Center for Risk-Based Community Resilience Planning (ID 1518)
John van De Lindt, Colorado State University; Bruce Ellingwood, Colorado State University; Daniel Cox, Oregon State University; Paolo Gardoni, University of Illinois- Urbana;

PEOPLES: An Indicator Based Tool to Compute Community Resilience (ID 1562)
Gian Paolo Cimellaro, Politecnico di Torino; Ali Zamani-Noori, Politecnico di Torino; Omar Kammouh, Politecnico di Torino; Sebastiano Marasco, Politecnico di Torino; Steve Mahin, University of California Berkeley;

Rapid and Seamless Earthquake Information to Inspire Individuals to Recognize Risk (ID 1893)
Alexandra Kim, Temblor; David Jackson, Temblor; Gabriel Lotto, Temblor; Geoffrey Ely, Temblor; Gitanjali Bhattarcharjee, Temblor; Jessica O’Sullivan, Temblor; Ross Stein, Temblor; Serkan Sevilgen, Temblor; Volkan Sevilgen, Temblor;

Seismic Resiliency Assessment of Urban Regions and Lifelines (Panel Discussion by Craig Davis (LADWP), John van de Lindt (Colorado State U.), Babak Kamrani (Karen Clark & Co.), Keith Porter (U. Colorado at Boulder), Thomas O’Rourke (Cornell U.), Charles Scawthorn (SPA Risk LLC), Volkan Sevilgen (Temblor Inc.)) (ID 1400)
Domniki Asimaki, California Institute of Technology; Ertugrul Taciroglu, University of California, Los Angeles;

SS019.S - Observing Resilience - A New Approach to Learning from EarthquakesS - Observing Resilience - A New Approach to Learning from Earthquakes

DATE/TIME: Wednesday 27-Jun-18 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm ROOM: San Gabriel

MODERATOR: Thalia Anagnos, San Jose State University;

CO-MODERATOR: Wael Hassan, American University in Cairo Housing & Building National Research Center;

DESCRIPTION: The LFE Travel Study Program is an initiative of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute (EERI) to conduct field study trips to earthquake affected regions around the world. The first program was held in Chile in January 2017. Using tools and approaches developed by EERI to study resilience in previous earthquakes, participants studied resilience of housing, schools, healthcare facilities, and businesses in Chile. This session presents the observations on recovery and resilience in Chile as well as lessons from this approach to learning from earthquakes.

LFE as a Development Tool for Next Generation Earthquake Professionals (ID 1852)
Alexandria Julius, Ohio State University; Felipe Rivera, CIGIDEN; Kelsey Wittels, Thornton Tomasetti; Mary Comerio, UC Berkeley; Rosario Walker, CICIDEN; Thalia Anagnos, San Jose State University;

Resiliency of Businesses During 2010 Maule Earthquake: An Investigation of the 2017 LFE Study Program (ID 1594)
Ana Maria Bastidas, Carlos H. Parra & Asociados; Alexandria Julius, Ohio State University; Quinn Peck, ARUP; Sandra Hyde, ICC;

Perspectives on Resilience: A Field Study of Housing Recovery in Chile After the 2010 Event (ID 1854)
Chad Norvell, Equitecture; Alvaro Rubiños, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú; Catherine Johnson, University of Minnesota; Laura Hernández, Gilsanz Murray Steficek;

Efficiency Assessment of Tsunami Evacuation Routes In Vina Del Mar, Chile (ID 1790)
Wael Hassan, American University in Cairo--Housing & Building National Research Center; Barbara Simpson, University of California, Berkeley; Marisella Ortega, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria; Preetish Kakoty, University of California, Irvine;

Wednesday 27-Jun-18: 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

SS020.S - Natural Hazards Engineering Research InfrastructureS - Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure

DATE/TIME: Wednesday 27-Jun-18 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm ROOM: Beaudry B

MODERATOR: Karina Vielma, University of Texas at San Antonio;

DESCRIPTION: The Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure (NHERI) is a distributed, multi-user, national facility that provides the natural hazards engineering community with state-of-the-art research infrastructure. Funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), NHERI enables researchers to explore and test ground-breaking concepts to protect homes, businesses and infrastructure lifelines from earthquakes and windstorms, enabling innovations to help prevent natural hazards from becoming societal disasters. The research infrastructure includes tsunami, coastal, earthquake and wind engineering experimental facilities, cyberinfrastructure, computational modeling and simulation tools, research data and expert personnel. When coupled with education and community outreach, NHERI will facilitate research and educational advances that contribute knowledge and innovation toward improving the resiliency of the nation's civil infrastructure to withstand natural hazards. This session features work-in-progress from research and educational programs at the sties and distributed among them.

The NHERI RAPID Facility: Enabling the Next-Generation of Natural Hazards Reconnaissance (ID 886)
Joseph Wartman, University of Washington; Ann Bostrom, University of Washington; Jeffrey Berman, University of Washington; Jennifer Irish, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Kurt Gurley, University of Florida; Laura Lowes, University of Washington; Michael Olsen, Oregon State University; Scott Miles, University of Washington;

Using Cloud-Based Data Analysis to Engage Undergraduates in Natural Hazards Engineering (ID 894)
Jamie Padgett, Rice University; Ammar Musa, University of Texas at San Antonio; Carl Bernier, Rice University; Charlie Dey, University of Texas at Austin; Clint Dawson, University of Texas at Austin; Ellen Rathjie, University of Texas at Austin; Maria Esteva, University of Texas at Austin; Olajide Ogunmola, University of Texas at San Antonio; Rosie Gomez, University of Texas at Austin; Yuxiang Lin, University of Texas at Austin;

Experimentally Validated Fragilities for Hurricane Resilience of Transmission Systems (ID 900)
Abdollah Shafieezadeh, The Ohio State University; Arindam Chowdhury, Florida International University;

The NHERI User Forum: Introduction and the Annual Community Report (ID 1772)
Elaina Sutley, University of Kansas; Adda Athanasopoulos-Zekkos, University of Michigan; Erik Johnson, University of Southern California; James Malley, Degenkolb Engineers; Liesel Ritchie, Colorado University; Mohamed Elsharawy, SOH Wind Engineering LLC; Nina Stark, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Ramtin Kargarmoakhar, T.Y. Lin International; Russell Green, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University;

SS021.S - Hazard-to-impact scenarios for preparation and post-event decision making: QuakeCoRE and international effortsS - Hazard-to-impact scenarios for preparation and post-event decision making: QuakeCoRE and international efforts

DATE/TIME: Wednesday 27-Jun-18 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm ROOM: San Gabriel

MODERATOR: Mary Comerio, U. C. Berkeley;

DESCRIPTION: Hazard-to-impact scenarios are one tangible mechanism to integrate earthquake science, engineering, impacts, emergency response and policy making. In this session we encourage presentations which address the integration of cutting-edge disciplinary research into such scenarios, their system-level implications, and adoption for emergency preparation or policy making. A panel and audience discussion following presentations (intended to take approximately 30mins) will address on going applications/advancements/challenges in such exercises to improve interdisciplinary research, policy implementation, and social awareness of earthquake hazards and risk mitigation.

Earthquake-induced ground motion geohazard and infrastructure impact modeling (ID SS077A)
Brendon Bradley, University of Canterbury;

Structural impacts and mitigation: From rural towns to urban centres (ID SS077B)
Ken Elwood, University of Auckland;

Project AF8: A Multi-Agency Response Planning and Community Resilience Initiative. (ID 1361)
Caroline Orchiston, University of Otago; David Johnston, Massey University/GNS Science; Jon Mitchell, Environment Southland; Thomas Wilson, University of Canterbury;

Lessons from engaging with NZ communities on earthquake preparedness (ID SS077C)
David Johnston, Joint Centre for Disaster Research, Massey University;

Panel discussion comprising international perspectives on hazard-to-impact scenarios (ID SS077D)
Mary Comerio, Architecture, U. C. Berkeley;

SS022.S - Integrating Structural Health Monitoring and Damage Identification with Post-Disaster Decision Making and Emergency Response ManagementS - Integrating structural health monitoring and damage identification with post-disaster decision making and emergency response management

DATE/TIME: Wednesday 27-Jun-18 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm ROOM: Santa Anita AB

MODERATOR: Monica Kohler Hamed Ebrahimian, California Institute of Technology;

CO-MODERATOR: Maria Todorovska, University of Southern California;

DESCRIPTION: The goal of this special session is to collect research and application studies that focus on practical methods for near real-time monitoring and damage detection, localization, quantification, and prognosis in civil structures. Our emphasis is to summon scholarly works that aim at bridging the gap between structural damage identification theory, and real-world application that can improve seismic resilience and recovery. The breadth of proposed topics promotes looking at the subject of post-earthquake emergency response management and decision making through combining practical methods for structural system identification, remaining life estimation, performance assessment, and risk evaluation with state-of-the-art technologies for sensing, monitoring, and data network considering real-world implementation complexities. This special session include new methods for assimilating, processing, and packaging actionable information and associated uncertainty metrics, which are intended for emergency responders and decision makers in pre-disaster mitigation and post-disaster response and recovery efforts of civil structures. The special session covers approaches for rapid seismic damage identification enabled by recent developments in seismic sensing and network technology for monitoring, condition assessment, and post-disaster evaluation of civil structures. New methods in inverse modeling, estimation, uncertainty quantification, system identification, and sensing for monitoring and condition assessment of structural systems, and stochastic methods for damage prognosis and propagating the uncertainties in the performance of civil structure to post-earthquake events are also included. Risk- and reliability-informed methods to guide evacuation, emergency response, inspection, retrofit, and rehabilitation, and methods for assessment of pre-event aging and deterioration, and post-event remaining useful life, reliability, and risk of operation of civil structures are covered. Research studies that present real-world implementation, and/or experimental investigations and validation of theories or analytical approaches are especially welcome.

Engineering Systems Reliability Combining Structural Health Monitoring with State-Of-The-Art Deterioration Models (ID 576)
Leandro Iannacone, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Paolo Gardoni, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign;

Damage Detection and Evaluation of Tall Buildings Using Pattern Recognition (ID 971)
Yu Zhang, University of California, Los Angeles; Henry Burton, University of California, Los Angeles; John Wallace, University of California, Los Angeles;

Time-Lapse Changes in Seismic Response of Building Over 20 Years Due to Earthquakes and Aging (ID 1117)
Nori Nakata, University of Oklahoma; Toshihide Kashima, Building Research Institute;

Post-Earthquake Structural Damage Assessment Through Point Cloud Data (ID 1406)
M. Ebrahim Mohammadi, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Richard Wood Wood, University of Nebraska-Lincoln;

Community Seismic Network and Localized Earthquake Situational Awareness (ID 1675)
Monica Kohler, California Institute of Technology; Anthony Massari, California Institute of Technology; Charles Dorn, California Institute of Technology; Hamed Ebrahimian, California Institute of Technology; Julian Bunn, California Institute of Technology; Mani Chandy, California Institute of Technology; Richard Guy, California Institute of Technology; Robert Clayton, California Institute of Technology; Thomas Heaton, California Institute of Technology;

Seismic Resiliency Is the Future of Smart Cities: Example Dubai (ID 605)
Derek Skolnik, Kinemetrics, Inc.; Dave Swanson, Reid Middleton; Erik Bishop, Reid Middleton; Mauricio Ciudad-Real, Kinemetrics, Inc.;

Wave Method for Structural Health Monitoring: Review of Recent Developments (ID 1249)
Maria Todorovska, University of Southern California; Mahdi Ebrahimian, University of Southern California; Mohammadtaghi Rahmani, California State University, Long Beach;

Application of Rotation Rate Sensors to Monitoring of Strain in Civil Engineering Structures [Poster Location 098] (ID 532)
Zbigniew Zembaty, Opole University of Technology; Juliusz Kuś, Opole University of Technology; Piotr Bobra, Opole University of Technology; Piotr Bońkowski, Opole University of Technology; Seweryn Kokot, Opole University of Technology; Zbigniew Zembaty, Opole University of Technology;

Thursday 28-Jun-18: 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

SS017.S - Protective Actions: Developing Context-Based Guidance on What to Do During an EarthquakeS - Protective Actions: Developing context-based guidance on what to do during an earthquake

DATE/TIME: Thursday 28-Jun-18 10:30 am - 12:00 pm ROOM: San Pedro

MODERATOR: Janise Rodgers, GeoHazards International;

DESCRIPTION: The safest actions to take during an earthquake may depend on your environment. A panel of professionals involved in developing or implementing guidance on protective actions to take during shaking will discuss current and proposed approaches. One of these is a context-based approach, which considers an individual's surroundings. Panelists will discuss the factors that need to be considered when developing protective actions guidance. Short presentations will be followed by a panel discussion on what to do during an earthquake in different settings.

Protective Actions: Developing Context-Based Messaging for to Do During an Earthquake (ID 1283)
Janise Rodgers, GeoHazards International; Maggie Ortiz-Millan, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute;

Discussion Panel (ID SS017A)
Janise Rodgers, GeoHazards International; Maggie Ortiz-Millan, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute; Mark Benthien, Southern California Earthquake Center, USC; Veronica Cedillos, Applied Technology Council;

SS024.S - Impacts of a Magnitude-9 Earthquake on the Pacific Northwest (The M9 Project): Part 1S - Impacts of a Magnitude-9 Earthquake on the Pacific Northwest (The M9 Project): Part 1

DATE/TIME: Thursday 28-Jun-18 10:30 am - 12:00 pm ROOM: San Gabriel

MODERATOR: Jeffrey Berman, University of Washington;

DESCRIPTION: The severity of a magnitude 9 earthquake on the PNW is largely unknown, because no ground-motion recordings are available for such megathrust earthquakes in the region. To compensate for the paucity of recordings, the UW research team collaborated with the United States Geological Survey to develop suites of simulated ground-motions for possible magnitude 9 rupture scenarios. These suites of motions were generated using physics-based ground-motion simulations that use a 3-dimensional seismic wave velocity model which represents the geological structure of the Cascadia Subduction Zone, including several deep sedimentary basins in the region (e.g., Puget Lowland basins, Tualatin basin). Researchers are probabilistically evaluating the ensuing consequences of a megathrust event on buildings and infrastructure, the potential for liquefaction and landslides, and the impact of a tsunami on coastal communities and major lifelines. The project team is also studying the use of earthquake early warning systems and methods of effective community planning to mitigate the harm caused from future earthquakes. This first of two sessions covers advances made by the M9 Project researchers in predicting the ground motions for the Magnitude 9 Cascadia event, characterizing those ground motions, and exploring the response of structural systems to such motions, including the effects of deep basin amplification and duration. Additional presentations on the response of structures to subduction interface ground motions are contributed by colleagues at the University of British Columbia.

3-D Simulations of M9 Earthquakes on the Cascadia Megathrust: Methodology and Results (ID 66)
Arthur Frankel, U.S. Geological Survey; Erin Wirth, University of Washington; John Vidale, University of Washington; Nasser Marafi, University of Washington; William Stephenson, U.S. Geological Survey;

3-D Simulations of M9 Earthquakes on the Cascadia Megathrust: Key Parameters and Uncertainty (ID 98)
Erin Wirth, U.S. Geological Survey; Arthur Frankel, U.S. Geological Survey; John Vidale, University of Washington; Nasser Marafi, University of Washington; William Stephenson, U.S. Geological Survey;

Effects of Simulated Magnitude 9 Earthquake Motions on Structures in the Pacific Northwest (ID 364)
Nasser Marafi, University of Washington; Arthur Frankel, U.S. Geological Survey; Erin Wirth, University of Washington; Jeffrey Berman, University of Washington; John Vidale, University of Washington; Marc Eberhard, University of Washington;

Effects of Basins During Subduction Earthquakes on the Collapse Fragility of Tall Steel Bldgs (ID 1570)
Carlos Molina Hutt, University of British Columbia; Jeffery Berman, University of Washington; Marc Eberhard, University of Washington; Nasser Marafi, University of Washington;

Modelling and Testing of Light-Frame Wood Buildings Subjected to Long Duration Motions (ID 1777)
Armin Bebamzadeh, University of British Columbia; Carlos Ventura, University of British Columbia; Marisa Mulder, Fast+EPP; Mehrtash Motamedi, University of British Columbia; Michael Fairhurst, University of British Columbia;

SS025.S - Mini-Workshop on Needs of Users of the USGS National Seismic Hazard ModelS - Mini-Workshop on Needs of Users of the USGS National Seismic Hazard Model

DATE/TIME: Thursday 28-Jun-18 10:30 am - 12:00 pm ROOM: Santa Anita C

MODERATOR: Nicolas Luco, U.S. Geological Survey;

CO-MODERATOR: Sanaz Rezaeian, USGS;

DESCRIPTION: In 2018 and 2020, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) plans to submit for publication updates to its National Seismic Hazard Model (NSHM). As part of prior updates in 1996, 2002, 2008, and 2014, the USGS funded the Applied Technology Council to convene workshops focused on needs of users of the NSHM, who include earthquake scientists, engineers, and policymakers. Rather than holding just one user-needs workshop with each update, the USGS intends to more frequently seize opportunities to engage users via special sessions at conferences. This 11NCEE mini-workshop on needs of users will focus on our 2018 USGS NSHM update, but with the opportunity to also discuss future user needs. Our main goal is to more effectively engage our users and to better understand the range of their applications. Users with whom the USGS is currently less engaged, in particular, are invited to explain their needs from the USGS NSHM. Attendees of the mini-workshop will also be asked to offer additional user needs that could be discussed in future workshops.

Preliminary 2018 National Seismic Hazard Models for the United States (ID 953)
Mark Petersen, USGS;

Uses of the USGS National Seismic Hazard Model (ID SS086A)
Sanaz Rezaeian, U.S. Geological Survey;

Overview of the USGS Unified Hazard Tool (ID 932)
Peter Powers, U.S. Geological Survey;

Streamlining of the USGS Seismic Design Maps Web Tools (ID SS086B)
Nicolas Luco, U.S. Geological Survey;

USACE Uses of the USGS National Seismic Hazard Model at Short and Long Return Periods (ID SS086C)
Thomas L. North, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers;

SS026.S - Steve Mahin RetrospectiveS - Steve Mahin Retrospective

DATE/TIME: Thursday 28-Jun-18 10:30 am - 12:00 pm ROOM: Santa Barbara

MODERATOR: James Malley, Degenkolb. Engineers;

CO-MODERATOR: Jack Moehle Yousef Bozorgnia, UC Berkeley;

DESCRIPTION: Professor Stephen A. Mahin's passing early this year was a great loss for the Earthquake Engineering Community. Six panelists from throughout Steve's career will share reflections on his many important contributions to the earthquake engineering profession and members of the community. Members of the audience will also be able to share their reflections on their relationship with Steve and the impacts he made.

Discussion Panel (ID SS105A)
Barbara Simpson, Doctoral Candidate, U.C. Berkeley; Benson Shing, U.C. San Diego; Jack Moehle, U.C. Berkeley; Keri Ryan, University of Nevada, Reno; Masayoshi Nakashima, Professor Emeritus Kyoto University and President Kobori Research Complex, Inc.; Michael Mahooney, FEMA;

Thursday 28-Jun-18: 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

SS027.S - An Analytical Deliberative Process for Developing Resilience-Based Seismic Performance Standards for Buildings and Lifeline SystemsS - An Analytical Deliberative Process for Developing Resilience-Based Seismic Performance Standards for Buildings and Lifeline Systems

DATE/TIME: Thursday 28-Jun-18 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm ROOM: Beaudry A

MODERATOR: Henry Burton, University of California Los Angeles;

CO-MODERATOR: Scott Miles Chris D. Poland, University of Washington Seattle Chris D. Poland Consulting Engineer;

DESCRIPTION: The development of a consistent set of performance standards for the built environment requires a systematic procedure, a pathway, that starts with establishing a community-level resilience objective and ends with having recovery-based performance targets for buildings and lifelines systems. This is an inherently complex and interdisciplinary problem that will require input from technical experts, stakeholders and members of the public. A possible framework that can serve as a template for formulating this procedure is the analytical-deliberative process, which provides guidelines for performing a systematic analysis of a specific risk problem, while responding to the needs of interested and affected parties and treating the relevant uncertainties in a comprehensive way. The analytical-deliberative process enables the integration of expert opinion, simulation modeling and stakeholder preferences. This special session is organized around the theme of formulating an analytical deliberative process for establishing resilience-based seismic performance standards for buildings and lifeline systems. The topics that will be addressed include (a) an overview of the current efforts and challenges towards developing resilience-based performance standards, (b) how those standards can be informed by simulation models that capture the response and recovery of sociotechnical systems impacted by extreme events and (c) an overview of the analytical deliberative process including how it can be used to develop recovery-based performance targets for the built infrastructure systems that support community functionality. The development of a consistent set of performance standards for the built environment requires a systematic procedure that starts with establishing a community-level resilience objective and ends with having recovery-based performance target for buildings and lifelines systems. This is an inherently complex and interdisciplinary problem that will require input from technical experts, stakeholders and members of the public. A possible framework that can serve as a template for formulating this procedure is the analytical-deliberative process, which provides guidelines for performing a systematic analysis of a specific risk problem, while responding to the needs of interested and affected parties and treating the relevant uncertainties in a comprehensive way. The analytical-deliberative process enables the integration of expert opinion, simulation modeling and stakeholder preferences. This special session is organized around the theme of formulating an analytical deliberative process for establishing resilience-based seismic performance standards for buildings and lifeline systems. The session will begin with a presentation by Chris Poland, who will discuss the specific objectives and current developments within the RRMC project. Scott Miles will then provide an overview of the analytical deliberative process and demonstrate how it can be used to develop recovery-based performance targets for the built infrastructure systems that support community functionality. Finally, presentations by Henry Burton and Rachel Davidson will focus on how post-earthquake recovery modeling can be used as a tool in the analytical deliberative process. Burton will show how performance-based earthquake engineering and urban simulation can be integrated to link individual building performance to community-scale recovery trajectories. Davidson will then describe the application of a discrete-event-simulation model of post-earthquake restoration for water and power systems.

Resilience-Based Performance Standards for Buildings and Lifeline Systems (ID 539)
Chris Poland, Chris D Poland Consulting Engineer; Henry Burton, UCLA;

A Performance-Based Post-Earthquake Housing Recovery Model (ID 509)
Hua Kang, ; Henry Burton, University of California, Los Angeles;

Modeling Infrastructure System Risk in Support of Community Resilience-Based Performance Standards (ID 756)
Rachel Davidson, University of Delaware;

Human-Centered Recovery Modeling for Analytic-Deliberative Seismic Resilience Planning (ID 408)
Scott Miles, University of Washington;

SS028.S - Creating Tools for School Safety and Advocacy in Our CommunitiesS - Creating Tools for School Safety and Advocacy in Our Communities

DATE/TIME: Thursday 28-Jun-18 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm ROOM: San Fernando

MODERATOR: Barry Welliver, BHW Engineers L.L.C;

DESCRIPTION: The Earthquake Engineering Research Institute’s School Earthquake Safety Initiative (SESI) is a global and collaborative network of diverse, expert, and passionate professionals who are committed to creating and sharing knowledge and tools that enable progressive, informed decision making around school earthquake safety. Its goal is to leverage the extensive expertise and reputation of its members to conduct regionally appropriate actions that make a tangible and positive difference in communities around the world, by protecting the lives of all who inhabit school buildings. The newly published FEMA P-1000; Safer, Stronger, Smarter: A Guide to Improving School Natural Hazard Safety similarly helps schools to develop comprehensive safety strategies for earthquakes and other natural hazards. This session will discuss the efforts of both SESI and FEMA P-1000 as vehicles for engaging school safety advocates in the complex task of educating risk holders, mitigating unsafe school buildings, and appealing to whole communities for the importance of our schools before, during, and after hazard events. School earthquake and hazard safety involves many stakeholders – Children, Parents, Teachers, School Administrators, School Boards, State Legislatures, and Federal Agencies. School safety advocates face the unique challenges of understanding and quantifying the risks of unsafe schools, conveying a compelling message to mitigate that risk and engaging both state and community resources and political will to take action in a timely manner. This session will present national case studies of programs and legislation used to educate, inventory, and appeal to these various stakeholders and identify some of the lessons learned along the way. Attendees will gain knowledge of the innovative ways that SESI and FEMA P-1000 are creating a hands-on approach for school safety advocacy by distilling inventory and assessment efforts into useable action tools, promoting state involvement in risk ownership and engaging the public in embracing the critical function of schools in our communities.

Missouri School Seismic Safety Initiative (ID 33)
Nathan Gould, ABS Consulting; Michael Griffin, CCS Group, Inc.; Phillip Gould, Washington Univesity in St. Louis;

FEMA P-1000: A School Safety Guide for Natural Hazards (ID 545)
Andrew Herseth, Federal Emergency Management Agency; Ayse Hortacsu, Applied Technology Council; Barry Welliver, BHW Engineers; Michael Mahoney, Federal Emergency Management Agency; Veronica Cedillos, Applied Technology Council;

Oregon Schools Prepare for Cascadia Earthquakes (ID 620)
Douglas Dougherty, Seaside School District; Edward Wolf, Independent Consultant; Yumei Wang, Oregon Dept Geology & Mineral Industries;

SESI: Talking Earthquake Safety With Local Influencers and Decision-Makers (ID 764)
Ivan Wong, Lettis Consultants International; Barry Welliver, BHW Engineers; Heidi Tremayne, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute; Lucy Arendt, St. Norbert College; Rob Jackson, AECOM; Veronica Cedillos, Applied Technology Council; William Holmes, Rutherford + Chekene; Zoe Yin, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute;

Multi-Hazard Physical Vulnerability Prioritization of School Infrastructure in the Philippines (ID 1325)
Carmine Galasso, University College London; Arash Nassirpour, University College London; Dina D'Ayala, University College London;

China Resilience of Schools to Seismic Hazard (CROSSH) (ID 1828)
Linghui Zhou, University College London; Carmine Galasso, University College London; Dina D'Ayala, University College London;

SS029.S - Impacts of a Magnitude-9 Earthquake on the Pacific Northwest (The M9 Project): Part 2S - Impacts of a Magnitude-9 Earthquake on the Pacific Northwest (The M9 Project): Part 2

DATE/TIME: Thursday 28-Jun-18 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm ROOM: San Gabriel

MODERATOR: Jeffrey Berman, University of Washington;

DESCRIPTION: A National Science Foundation-funded interdisciplinary research project (The M9 Project) at the University of Washington is studying the impacts of a large-magnitude, megathrust earthquake on the Pacific Northwest (PNW). This project aims to evaluate and reduce the catastrophic consequences of Cascadia megathrust earthquakes on the social, built, and natural environments through research advances in methodologies, warnings, design, and community planning. The severity of a magnitude 9 earthquake on the PNW is largely unknown, because no ground-motion recordings are available for such megathrust earthquakes in the region. To compensate for the paucity of recordings, the UW research team collaborated with the United States Geological Survey to develop suites of simulated ground-motions for possible magnitude 9 rupture scenarios. These suites of motions were generated using physics-based ground-motion simulations that use a 3-dimensional seismic wave velocity model which represents the geological structure of the Cascadia Subduction Zone, including several deep sedimentary basins in the region (e.g., Puget Lowland basins, Tualatin basin). Researchers are probabilistically evaluating the ensuing consequences of a megathrust event on buildings and infrastructure, the potential for liquefaction and landslides, and the impact of a tsunami on coastal communities and major lifelines. The project team is also studying the use of earthquake early warning systems and methods of effective community planning to mitigate the harm caused from future earthquakes. This second of two sessions covers advances made by the M9 Project researchers in understanding liquefaction in long-duration ground motions, landslide triggering in large magnitude subduction earthquakes, tsunami inundation modeling, structural behavior in tsunamis, effective use of earthquake early warning systems and community planning that includes uncertainty and builds on community values.

The Effects of Long-Duration Ground Motion on Soil Liquefaction (ID 173)
Michael Greenfield, University of Washington; Steven Kramer, University of Washington;

Policy, Early Warning & Planning: Earthquake Experiences, Preparedness & Expectations in WA (ID 786)
Alicia Ahn, University of Washington; Ann Bostrom, University of Washington; Dan Abramson, University of Washington; John Vidale, University of Washington;

Cascadia Subduction Zone Coseismic Landslide Mapping and Hazard Forecasting (ID 902)
Alex Grant, University of Washington; Alison Duvall, University of Washington; Joseph Wartman, University of Washington; Sean LaHusen, University of Washington;

Multi-Scale and Probabilistic Modeling of Tsunami Forces on Structures (ID 915)
Michael Motley, University of Washington; Andrew Winter, ; Cassidy Gills, ; Frank Gonzalez, University of Washington; Marc Eberhard, University of Washington; Randall LeVeque, University of Washington; Xinsheng Qin, ;

SS030.S - Strong Motion ForumS - Strong Motion Forum

DATE/TIME: Thursday 28-Jun-18 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm ROOM: Santa Anita C

MODERATOR: Jamie Steidl, UCSB;

CO-MODERATOR: ROBERT NIGBOR, UCLA;

DESCRIPTION: The Strong Motion Forum has been a part of the EERI Annual Meetings for several decades. It now has its own technical session with a focus on new strong motion data and new developments in strong motion monitoring. There will be one overview presentation, then short presentations and discussion by members of a panel focusing on strong motion monitoring needs. There will be time at the end for the usual open discussion of strong motion issues.

Updates on Data and New Developments at Center for Engineering Strong Motion Data and COSMOS (ID 922)
Hamid Haddadi, California Geological Survey; Anthony Shakal, California Geological Survey; Christopher Stephens, U.S. Geological Survey; Jamison Steidl, UC Santa Barbara; Lind Gee, U.S. Geological Survey; Moh Huang, California Geological Survey;

Thursday 28-Jun-18: 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

SS031.5. S - A Session to Remember Mete Sozen

DATE/TIME: Thursday 28-Jun-18 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm ROOM: San Pedro

MODERATOR: Jack Moehle, UC Berkeley;

CO-MODERATOR: Santiago Pujol, Purdue;

DESCRIPTION: This special session will honor Mete Sozen and his contributions from nearly 6 decades of work for the profession.

ACI 318 Floor Slab Design - Role of Tests, Observations, and Mete Sozen (ID Sozen01)
Jim Jirsa, University of Texas at Austin;

From Acceleration to Velocity for Displacement (ID Sozen02)
Adolfo Matamoros, University of Texas at San Antonio; Andres Lepage, University of Kansas; Arturo Schultz, University of Minnesota;

From Complexity to Simplicity - How Mete Sozen Arrived at Priority Index (ID Sozen03)
Ayhan Irfanoglu, Purdue University ; Terrence Paret, Wiss Janney Elstner;

The Social Contract (ID Sozen04)
Jack Moehle, University of California, Berkeley; Santiago Pujol, Purdue University ;

My Father (ID Sozen05)
Timothy Sozen, ;

SS031.S - Achieving Water Supply Network Seismic Reliability and ResilienceS - Achieving Water Supply Network Seismic Reliability and Resilience

DATE/TIME: Thursday 28-Jun-18 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm ROOM: Beaudry A

MODERATOR: Charles Scawthorn, SPA Risk and Univ. California at Berkeley;

CO-MODERATOR: Craig Davis, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power;

DESCRIPTION: SPONSORED BY IMAGECAT. A number of major water supply projects have recently been undertaken to achieve water supply network resilience in the face of major earthquakes, including projects for the cities of Los Angeles, San Francisco, Oakland/East Bay, and Portland OR. This session combines papers on each project with a panel discussion to explore innovations that were achieved in these projects, and issues requiring further research. Innovations include a new algorithm for efficient network reliability improvement, improved assessment of buried pipe performance given large permanent ground displacements (PGD), a first time assessment of hydrant vulnerability based on FEM analysis, and a detailed model for water supply resource requirements and restoration following major disasters. While each project had unique challenges, there were a number of issues common to all, which however were each approached and resolved somewhat differently. These included defining reliability and resilience goals and hydraulic demands, assessing ground motions and PGD, assessing buried pipe performance, analyzing large network hydraulics and reliability, and determining affordable solutions. The session includes a panel that integrates discussion of these issues across all the projects.

Assuring Seismic Resilience for the Los Angeles Water System (ID 512)
Craig Davis, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power;

Complying with the Oregon Resilience Plan – Case Study of the Portland, Oregon Water Supply System (ID 1039)
Ahmed Nisar, InfraTerra, Inc.; Charles Scawthorn, SPA Risk, LLC; Christopher Hitchcock, InfraTerra, Inc.; Mike Greenfield, ; Ryan Nelson, City of Portland Water Bureau; Thomas O'Rourke, Cornell University; Vladimir Calugaru, InfraTerra, Inc.;

Optimizing Water Distribution System Pipe Replacement: San Francisco AWSS (ID 523)
Charles Scawthorn, SPA Risk; David Myerson, San Francisco Public Utilities Commission; Douglas York, Public Works; Eugene Ling, Public Works;

Will the San Francisco East Bay Water Supply Go Haywire? (ID 748)
Keith Porter, University of Colorado Boulder;

Integrated Seismic Resilience Strategy for the Metropolitan Water District (ID 1052)
David Clark, MWD OF SO. CALIFORNIA; Greg de Lamare, MWD OF SO. CALIFORNIA;

Multi-Agency Seismic Resilience Water Supply Task Force (ID 1133)
David Clark, MWD OF SO. CALIFORNIA; Craig Davis, LADWP; David Rennie, California Department of Water Resources;

SS032.S - Mini-Workshop on Next-Generation Performance ObjectivesS - Mini Workshop on Next Generation Performance Objectives

DATE/TIME: Thursday 28-Jun-18 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm ROOM: Hollywood

MODERATOR: Jon Heintz, Applied Technology Council;

DESCRIPTION: The Applied Technology Council (ATC) recently completed a series of projects evaluating performance of buildings designed to current codes and standards. The projects investigated performance of commercial and residential buildings across a broad range of criteria including: collapse probability, repair costs, repair time, casualties, unsafe placarding, damage and collapse of wood light-frame residential buildings, and safety and functionality of nonstructural components. Results from these studies provide information on which to base evolving performance objectives and design criteria presented in future codes and standards. This session will present state-of-the art performance information as measured or re-envisioned in four FEMA- and NIST-funded projects conducted by ATC, and will solicit comments and feedback from the audience in a mini-workshop setting.

Expected Seismic Performance of New Code Conforming Buildings (ID 458)
Ronald Hamburger, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger;

Improved Seismic Design of Nonstructural Components and Systems (ATC-120) (ID 1546)
Maryann Phipps, Estructure; Bret Lizundia, Rutherford and Chekene; John Gillengerten, Structural Engineer; Robert Pekelnecky, Degenkolb Engineers; Scott Schiff, Applied Technology Council;

Solutions to the Short-Period Building Performance Paradox (ID 145)
Charles Kircher, Kircher & Associates;

Vulnerability Based Seismic Assessment and Retrofit of One- And Two-Family Dwellings (ID 446)
Kelly Cobeen, Wiss Janney Elstner Assoc.; Colin Blaney, Buehler & Buehler Structural Engineers Inc.;

SS033.S - Teaching School Safety and Advocacy in the ClassroomS - Teaching School Safety and Advocacy in the Classroom

DATE/TIME: Thursday 28-Jun-18 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm ROOM: San Fernando

MODERATOR: Lelli Van Den Einde, University of California San Diego;

CO-MODERATOR: Zoe Yin, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute;

DESCRIPTION: The Earthquake Engineering Research Institute’s School Earthquake Safety Initiative (SESI) is a global and collaborative network of diverse, expert, and passionate professionals who are committed to creating and sharing knowledge and tools that enable progressive, informed decision making about school earthquake safety. The Classroom Education and Outreach SESI subcommittee uses education in the classroom to create an ongoing dialogue with parents, students, teachers, and administrators to develop advocates for earthquake school safety. It works to bring together EERI regional and student chapters to collaborate on delivering activities and serving as an expert resource for stakeholders. This session will use hands-on demonstrations of 4th grade and high school curriculum developed by the Classroom Education and Outreach subcommittee to show attendees how they can utilize SESI curriculum and resources to advocate for improved school earthquake safety in their own communities. This session will include an interactive demonstration of hands-on classroom equipment used to teach school children and their teachers about earthquake engineering and earthquake safety. They will get to use K’NEX materials to design their own seismically sound structures and test their efficacy using shake tables in a hands-on learning environment. Attendees will also participate in a discussion on best practices and successful approaches to classroom visits. Participants will leave the session with new advocacy ideas, the tools and knowledge to promote earthquake safety in their local schools, and a new network of school earthquake safety advocates through which they can continue to improve and elevate the practices that they learn in the session.

Developing a Sustainable Approach to Teaching School Safety and Advocacy in the Classroom (ID 1736)
Lelli Van Den Einde, University of California, San Diego; Heidi Tremayne, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute;

Seismic Risk Assessment and Educational Outreach for Schools in Central Washington (ID 913)
Andrew Sen, University of Washington; Nasser Marafi, University of Washington; Recep Cakir, Washington State Department of Natural Resources;

Teaching School Safety and Advocacy in the Classroom (ID 130)
Barbara Simpson, University of California, Berkeley; Amory Martin, Stanford University; Andrew Sen, University of Washington; Lelli Van Den Einde, UC San Diego; Thalia Anagnos, San Jose State University; Zahraa Saiyed, USF/Scyma Consulting; Zoe Yin, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute;

SS034.S - Innovations of the HayWired ScenarioS - Innovations of the HayWired Scenario

DATE/TIME: Thursday 28-Jun-18 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm ROOM: San Gabriel

MODERATOR: Anne Wein Ken Hudnut, U.S. Geological Survey;

CO-MODERATOR: Tim McCrink, CGS;

DESCRIPTION: The earthquake scenario, HayWired, refers to the rupture of the Hayward Fault and to the potential disruption to our wired and wireless world. More generally, “wired” represents interconnectedness at many levels— in the seismicity evidenced by afterslip and aftershocks, interdependencies of lifelines, social connectivity through technology and within communities, and ripple effects of damages and disruption throughout and encompassing the modern digital economy. HayWired starts with a largely physics-based 3D-model of the earthquake for shaking damage assessments. Scenario innovations include estimation of shaking damages for the aftershock sequence; earthquake-related ground failures and resulting damages; fire following earthquake damages; entrapment of people; and benefits of water distribution system improvements, performance-based building codes, and earthquake early warning. HayWired delves deeper into social and economic impacts by considering population displacement; socioeconomic and community constraints; relationships between workplaces and homes; and the role of technology in response and recovery. The HayWired coalition builds on the Bay Area’s foundation of earthquake preparedness embracing the goals to (1) help build community capacity to respond to and recover from earthquakes, (2) advance basic knowledge of earthquake risks; (3) inform actions to reduce earthquake risks; and (4) improve the communication and use of earthquake-hazard science in decision-making.

Innovations of the HayWired Scenario (ID 1838)
Anne Wein, USGS;

HayWired Scenario Mainshock—Earthquake-Induced Ground Failure Hazards (ID SS082C)
Tim McCrinck, CGS;

Basic Research from the HayWired Scenario to Better Inform Resilience Plans (ID 812)
Keith Porter, University of Colorado Boulder;

Fire Following the Mw 7.0 HayWired Earthquake (ID 689)
Charles Scawthorn, SPA Risk LLC;

Case Studies of Tall-Building Structural Analyses and Downtime and Loss Assessment for the HayWired Scenario Mainshock (ID SS082B)
Ibrahim Almufti , ARUP ;

Communities at Risk of Population Displacement and Long-term Recovery Challenges in the HayWired Scenario (ID SS082A)
Laurie Johnson, Laurie Johnson Consulting and Research;

The HayWired Scenario-How Can the San Francisco Bay Region Bounce Back Better? (ID 1431)
Anne Wein, USGS; Dale Cox, USGS; Jennifer Strauss, University of California Berkeley; Keith Porter, University of Colorado; Kenneth Hudnut, USGS; Laurie Johnson, Laurie Johnson Consulting; Suzanne Perry, USGS;

Communities at Risk of Population Displacement and Long-term Recovery Challenges in the HayWired Scenario (ID SS082A)
Laurie Johnson, Laurie Johnson Consulting and Research;

SS039A.S - Recent Advancements and Future Trends in Performance-Based Earthquake Engineering (Part 1)S - Recent Advancements and Future Trends in Performance-Based Earthquake Engineering

DATE/TIME: Thursday 28-Jun-18 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm ROOM: Santa Anita C

MODERATOR: Eduardo Miranda, Stanford University;

CO-MODERATOR: Dimitrios Lignos, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL);

DESCRIPTION: Performance-based earthquake engineering makes use of structural models, methods of analysis and seismic loads, yet they all possess an inherent degree of uncertainty. Whether it is aleatory or epistemic, they both ultimately influence structural demand and capacity estimates, as well as performance estimates such as the probability of collapse or demolition or of estimates of earthquake-induced economic losses. This session gathers several interesting recent studies on Performance-Based Earthquake Engineering covering a wide and interesting group of topics.

The Role of Spectral Shape and Pulse Period for Record Selection in the Near Field (ID 1192)
Paolo Bazzurro, University School for Advanced Studies IUSS Pavia; Dimitrios Vamvatsikos, National Technical University of Athens; Mohsen Kohrangi, University School for Advanced Studies IUSS Pavia ;

Accounting for Demand Variability of Steel Braced Frames with a Combined Intensity Measure (ID 1003)
Nasser Marafi, University of Washington; Andrew Sen, University of Washington; Charles Roeder, University of Washington; Dawn Lehman, University of Washington; Jeffrey Berman, University of Washington; Marc Eberhard, University of Washington; Tao Li, Tongji University;

Visualizing the Demand and Capacity Factor Design (DCFD) Format for Safety-Checking (ID 859)
Fatemeh Jalayer, University of Naples Federico II;

Improved Approach to Estimate the Probability of Collapse of Structures During Earthquakes (ID 1000)
Hector Davalos, Stanford University; Eduardo Miranda, Stanford University;

Quantifying Improvements in Seismic Performance Possible Through Retrofit of RC Frames (ID 738)
Abbie Liel, University of Colorado ; Cody Harrington, Gabbart & Woods;

Friday 29-Jun-18: 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

SS036.S - Comprehensive Disaster Resilience Begins to Take ShapeS - Comprehensive Disaster Resilience Begins to Take Shape

DATE/TIME: Friday 29-Jun-18 10:30 am - 12:00 pm ROOM: Beaudry A

MODERATOR: Evan Reis, US Resiliency Council;

DESCRIPTION: A special session is proposed to examine comprehensive strategies of holistic community resilience emerging in cities like Los Angeles, San Francisco and Portland. The disaster resilience cycle consists of Mitigation, Preparedness, Response and Recovery. Communities considering the entire cycle will be better prepared for natural disasters and offer a more sustainable model. Mitigation has traditionally focused on large cities enacting retrofit ordinances for high risk buildings such as URMs. Recently, soft-story wood and non-ductile concrete ordinances have been promulgated by these and smaller communities. We will learn about the successful effort in Santa Monica to enact a retrofit ordinance for buildings vulnerable to collapse in earthquakes, and what interested communities can learn from this experience. Mitigation is also about avoiding risk through building design to performance standards that will not only protect occupants, but reduce damage and recovery time. A resilient community must allow residents not only to survive the initial shock but restore livelihoods quickly. Once generally limited to buildings on a case-by-case basis, we will learn about the collaborative efforts of Southern California stakeholders to educate on current code performance expectations and the potential to improve performance requirements for new buildings, making cities more robust and failure resistant after a major seismic event. Preparedness, response and recovery are essential elements of cities’ overall disaster resilience. Training personnel, coordinating emergency response among city agencies and stakeholders, and collaboration between public and private sectors during the critical post-disaster days and weeks will affect the pace of recovery as much as the performance of the infrastructure itself. We will showcase how the USGS is developing its ShakeCast tool that can be used to provide citywide damage and social impact assessments in advance of and immediately following a major earthquake. Overlaying all aspects of the disaster resilience cycle is communication between communities and stakeholders. To support enhanced codes and greater resilience investment, stakeholders must understand the risks faced by cities in natural disasters; be able to make rational, fact-based, decisions about costs and benefits associated with resilience investment; and perceive the personal, social and economic value of these investments. We will learn about how the efforts of the US Resiliency Council to communicate these issues in Southern California and around the west coast are changing the way stakeholders think and value the work of engineers to build more resilient communities.

City of Santa Monica: Successful Implementation of Smaller Community Resilience (ID 1753)
Ron Takiguchi, City of Santa Monica;

The Southern California Story; No Longer Just Waiting (ID 931)
Matt Barnard, Degenkolb Engineers;

The USGS ShakeCast System for Earthquake Planning, Preparedness, Response and Recovery (ID 372)
Charles Kircher, Charles A Kircher and Associates;

Communicating a Building's Contribution to Community Resilience (ID 401)
Chris Poland, Chris D Poland Consulting Engineer; Evan Reis, US Resiliency Council;

SS037.S - The Science, Engineering Applications, and Policy Implications of Simulation-based PSHAS - The Science, Engineering Applications, and Policy Implications of Simulation-based PSHA

DATE/TIME: Friday 29-Jun-18 10:30 am - 12:00 pm ROOM: Beaudry B

MODERATOR: Morgan Moschetti Nicolas Luco Sanaz Razaeian, U.S. Geological Survey;

CO-MODERATOR: Christine Goulet, USC;

DESCRIPTION: The session will include presentations on the use of earthquake ground motions for characterizing seismic hazard in Los Angeles and Seattle, current plans for incorporating these results into local- and national-scale seismic hazard analyses, and the use of the resulting simulation-based seismic hazard for engineering design and policy decisions. Presentations will be followed by a panel discussion with the invited presenters.

The Science, Engineering Applications, and Policy Implications of Simulation-Based PSHA (ID 939)
Morgan Moschetti, U.S. Geological Survey; Allison Shumway, ; Arthur Frankel, U.S. Geological Survey; C.B. Crouse, AECOM; Christine Goulet, Southern California Earthquake Center; Hamilton Puangnak, ; Kevin Milner, ; Mark Petersen, USGS; Nicolas Luco, US Geological Survey; Peter Powers, U.S. Geological Survey; Robert Graves, US Geological Survey; Sanaz Rezaeian, US Geological Survey; Scott Callaghan, ; Susan Chang, ; Thomas Jordan, University of Southern California;

CyberShake: Simulation-based Seismic Hazard Analysis (ID SS101A)
Robert Graves, U.S. Geological Survey;

Use of 3D Ground-Motion Simulations for Seismic Hazard Mapping in the Pacific Northwest (ID SS101B)
Arthur Frankel, U.S. Geological Survey;

CyberShake simulations for seismic design of tall buildings in southern CA (ID SS101C)
C.B. Crouse, AECOM;

Estimating Basin Effects Using M9 and Recent Research for Tall Building Design in Seattle (ID SS101D)
Susan Chang, City of Seattle, Department of Construction and Inspections;

Incorporating 3D simulations into the U.S. National Seismic Hazard Model (ID SS101E)
Morgan Moschetti, U.S. Geological Survey;

SS039.S - Recent Advancements and Future Trends in Performance-Based Earthquake EngineeringS - Recent Advancements and Future Trends in Performance-Based Earthquake Engineering

DATE/TIME: Friday 29-Jun-18 10:30 am - 12:00 pm ROOM: Hollywood

MODERATOR: Dimitrios Lignos, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL);

CO-MODERATOR: Eduardo Miranda, Stanford University;

DESCRIPTION: Performance-based earthquake engineering necessitates the use of structural models, methods of analysis and seismic loads, yet they all possess an inherent degree of uncertainty. Whether it is aleatory or epistemic, they both ultimately influence structural demand and capacity estimates, as well as performance estimates such as the probability of collapse or demolition or of estimates of earthquake-induced economic losses. Of interest to this session are studies dealing with any facet of this complex process including its modeling, analysis, quantification and propagation of uncertainty from the level of laboratory testing and seismic loads to the final structural design or performance assessment. We also welcome opinion papers on the future and the challenges of performance-based earthquake engineering targeting their eventual adoption in practice.

Use of Physics-Based Ground Motion Simulations in PBEE (ID 747)
Brendon Bradley, University of Canterbury;

Rocking Walls with Lead Extrusion Dampers, Protect Formerly Homeless Seniors from EQ Risks (ID 1797)
David Mar, Mar Structural Design; Sandesh Aher, Mar Structural Design;

Evaluating Liquefaction-Induced Building Settlements (ID 656)
Jonathan Bray, Univ. of California, Berkeley; Jorge Macedo, UC Berkeley;

Quantifying Improvements in Seismic Performance Possible Through Retrofit of RC Frames (ID 738)
Abbie Liel, University of Colorado ; Cody Harrington, Gabbart & Woods;

Visualizing the Demand and Capacity Factor Design (DCFD) Format for Safety-Checking (ID 859)
Fatemeh Jalayer, University of Naples Federico II;

Improved Approach to Estimate the Probability of Collapse of Structures During Earthquakes (ID 1000)
Hector Davalos, Stanford University; Eduardo Miranda, Stanford University;

Accounting for Demand Variability of Steel Braced Frames with a Combined Intensity Measure (ID 1003)
Nasser Marafi, University of Washington; Andrew Sen, University of Washington; Charles Roeder, University of Washington; Dawn Lehman, University of Washington; Jeffrey Berman, University of Washington; Marc Eberhard, University of Washington; Tao Li, Tongji University;

The Role of Spectral Shape and Pulse Period for Record Selection in the Near Field (ID 1192)
Paolo Bazzurro, University School for Advanced Studies IUSS Pavia; Dimitrios Vamvatsikos, National Technical University of Athens; Mohsen Kohrangi, University School for Advanced Studies IUSS Pavia ;

Issues with Applying Performance-Based Engineering to Distributed Infrastructure Systems (ID 1817)
Jack Baker, Stanford University;

SS039B.S - Recent Advancements and Future Trends in Performance-Based Earthquake Engineering (Part 2)S - Recent Advancements and Future Trends in Performance-Based Earthquake Engineering

DATE/TIME: Friday 29-Jun-18 10:30 am - 12:00 pm ROOM: Hollywood

MODERATOR: Dimitrios Lignos, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL);

CO-MODERATOR: Eduardo Miranda, Stanford University;

DESCRIPTION: Performance-based earthquake engineering makes use of structural models, methods of analysis and seismic loads, yet they all possess an inherent degree of uncertainty. Whether it is aleatory or epistemic, they both ultimately influence structural demand and capacity estimates, as well as performance estimates such as the probability of collapse or demolition or of estimates of earthquake-induced economic losses. This session gathers several interesting recent studies on Performance-Based Earthquake Engineering covering a wide and interesting group of topics.

Use of Physics-Based Ground Motion Simulations in PBEE (ID 747)
Brendon Bradley, University of Canterbury;

Evaluating Liquefaction-Induced Building Settlements (ID 656)
Jonathan Bray, Univ. of California, Berkeley; Jorge Macedo, UC Berkeley;

Rocking Walls with Lead Extrusion Dampers, Protect Formerly Homeless Seniors from EQ Risks (ID 1797)
David Mar, Mar Structural Design; Sandesh Aher, Mar Structural Design;

Issues with Applying Performance-Based Engineering to Distributed Infrastructure Systems (ID 1817)
Jack Baker, Stanford University;

SS040.S - ILEE researchS - ILEE research

DATE/TIME: Friday 29-Jun-18 10:30 am - 12:00 pm ROOM: Santa Anita AB

MODERATOR: Tony Yang, International Joint Research Laboratory of Earthquake Engineering;

DESCRIPTION: International joint research laboratory of earthquake engineering (ILEE) is an international center of excellence funded by the Chinese government to conduct high-end international collaborative research on earthquake engineering. ILEE has established formal multi year Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with 7 leading earthquake engineering research centers worldwide. This includes the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER) in United States, Multidisciplinary Center for Earthquake Engineering Research (MCEER) in United States, Urban Disaster Prevention Research Core (UDPRC) in Japan, EUCenter in Italy, National Center for Research on Earthquake Engineering (NCREE) in Taiwan, Earthquake Engineering Research Facility (EERF) in Canada, NZ Center for Earthquake Resilience (QuakeCoRE) in New Zealand. The core of ILEE research theme is in the research and development of earthquake resilient infrastructures. ILEE has 5 major research thrusts, this include building engineering, bridge engineering, lifeline engineering, major energy facilities and geotechnical engineering. In this special session, the ILEE funded international research projects will be presented.

SMA Ring Spring Systems: Innovations in Self-Centering Steel Connection Design (ID 179)
Wei Wang, Tongji University; Cheng Fang, Tongji University; James Ricles, Lehigh University; Richard Sause, Lehigh University; Yiyi Chen, Tongji University;

Shake-Table Test on a Low-Damage Concrete Wall Building: Building Design (ID 268)
Yiqiu Lu, University of Auckland; Anqi Gu, Tongji University; Geoff Rodgers, University of Canterbury; Kenneth Elwood, University of Auckland; Rick Henry, University of Auckland; T.Y. Yang, Tongji University; Yi Xiao, Tongji University; Ying Zhou, Tongji University;

Large-Scale Shake-Table Test on a Low-Damage Concrete Wall Building: Numerical Modeling and Analysis (ID 299)
Anqi Gu, College of Civil Engineering, Tongji University; Geoff Rodgers, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Canterbury, New Zealand; Ken Elwood, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Auckland, New Zealand; Rick Henry, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Auckland, New Zealand; Tony Yang, College of Civil Engineering, Tongji University; Yi Xiao, College of Civil Engineering, Tongji University; Ying Zhou, College of Civil Engineering, Tongji University; Yiqiu Lu, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Auckland, New Zealand;

Development of High-Performance Earthquake-Resilient Tall Buildings (ID 381)
Lisa Tobber, UBC; Perry Adebar, UBC; Tony T.Y. Yang, ILEE+UBC;

design and Analysis of Vertical Isolation System with Quasi-Zero-Stiffness Property (ID 442)
Peng Chen, Tongji University; Gilberto Mosqueda, University of California, San Diego; Ying Zhou, Tongji University;

SS041.S - Impacts of Induced Seismicity on Infrastructure SystemsS - Impacts of Induced Seismicity on Infrastructure Systems

DATE/TIME: Friday 29-Jun-18 10:30 am - 12:00 pm ROOM: Santa Barbara

MODERATOR: Mervyn Kowalsky, NC State;

CO-MODERATOR: Zia Zafir, Kleinfelder;

DESCRIPTION: Since 2009, there has been a rapid increase in the number of earthquakes in regions such as Oklahoma. The causes for these events have been attributed to induced seismicity, most commonly a product of disposal well injection from hydraulic fracturing. The objective of this session is to span aspects of seismology, ground motion models, societal issues for regions of the country where hazards have been elevated, observed damage due to induced seismicity, and rapid assessment approaches. At the end of the session, we plan to have an interactive panel discussion where each of the speakers will discuss future research needs in this area, while also entertaining questions from the audience addressed to the panel.

A Half-Century of Induced Earthquakes in the Los Angeles Basin? (ID 21)
Susan Hough, US Geological Survey; Morgan Page, US Geological Survey; Roger Bilham, University of Colorado;

Issues with Incorporating Induced-Seismicity Hazard Models Into Building Codes (ID 128)
Nicolas Luco, U.S. Geological Survey;

Risk Analysis and Risk Management for Induced Seismicity (ID 203)
Jack Baker, Stanford University; Abhineet Gupta, Stanford University;

Response of Typical Oklahoma Bridges to Recent Earthquakes (ID 1616)
Philip Harvey, University of Oklahoma; Ivanna Kaid Bay Cortez, University of Oklahoma; Kanthasamy Muraleetharan, University of Oklahoma; Samantha Heinrich, University of Oklahoma;

 

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